Tough Crowd

Members of Neturei Karta, a fringe ultra-Orthodox movement within the anti-Zionist bloc, and Islamic Movement leader Raed Salah (white cap) take part in a protest in East Jerusalem October 6, 2009.  (REUTERS/Ammar Awad photo.)

Members of Neturei Karta, a fringe ultra-Orthodox movement within the anti-Zionist bloc, and Islamic Movement leader Raed Salah (white cap) take part in a protest in East Jerusalem October 6, 2009. (REUTERS/Ammar Awad photo.)

Palestinian leaders said they made a mistake by suspending action on the U.N. report on Gaza war crimes, a member of President Mahmoud Abbas’ inner circle said Wednesday. It’s the first such acknowledgment after days of protests in the West Bank and Gaza. (AP)

Afghan political leader Gulbuddin Hekmatyar said that the war launched against the Taliban and al-Qaeda by the U.S. in 2001 was not justified, as the September 11 attacks had not been carried out by Afghans. In other words, he’s calling an Iraq. (Al Jazeera)

Meanwhile, President Obama said that he will not consider scaling back troops in Afghanistan in his upcoming review of the conflict. (BBC)

Police have been deployed in Jerusalem to deal with unrest sparked by rumors that Israeli extremists would march on Al-Aqsa mosque, a site sacred to Muslims. So far, there has only been low level violence and no such march on the Al-Aqsa has actually occurred. (NPR)

More Conde Nastiness. The company — which shed four magazines in the past week — is saying  goodbye to Details vice president and publisher Steven DeLuca. (Crain’s)

Pakistan’s parliament debated a $7.5 billion U.S. aid bill among mounting criticism that money aimed at helping the nation battle Islamist extremism came with too many strings attached. (AFP)

U.S. Congress last week voted to triple aid to Pakistan over the next five years, with funds earmarked for building schools, roads and democratic institutions — measures aimed at stemming a growing Taliban insurgency.

But critics in opposition and the military say the bill places too many conditions on the aid, including an attempt to curtail the nation’s nuclear programme and putting too much pressure on Pakistan alone to battle militants.

The U.S. threatened to derail a deal on global climate change today in a public showdown with China, expressing deep opposition to the existing Kyoto protocol — which targets emissions cuts for industrialized nations . The ‘States called on other rich countries to join hands to set up a new agreement which would, unlike Kyoto, force all countries to reduce emissions. (Guardian)

Staff

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